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  • Muay Thai to make debut at European Games 2023

    Muay Thai, the popular kickboxing martial art and combat sport, regarded as Thailand’s national sport, will be a competitive event at the European Games, in Kraków, Poland in June 2023,...

    The post Muay Thai to make debut at European Games 2023 first appeared on Thai PBS World : The latest Thai news in English, News Headlines, World News and News Broadcasts in both Thai and English. We bring Thailand to the world.

    Muay Thai, the popular kickboxing martial art and combat sport, regarded as Thailand’s national sport, will be a competitive event at the European Games, in Kraków, Poland in June 2023, after approval from the European Olympic Committees (EOC), according to the International Federation of Muay Thai Associations (IFMA).

    “It is wonderful news that the EOC has included Muay Thai in the games, considering that it is a fast-growing sport in terms of both athletes and spectators,” said Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha on Tuesday.

    “It is delightful that Muay Thai has become a very popular sport both in Thailand and internationally,” he added.

    According to the prime minister, the Tourism and Sports Ministry has been working with relevant agencies to lobby for the martial art to be recognized at the Olympic Games. The sport has had provisional Olympic status since 2016.

    Muay Thai dates back centuries and grew in popularity worldwide during the late 20th century. The IFMA, which is recognized by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) as the world governing body for the sport, has 146 National Federation members.

    The European Games 2023 will be the third, and is held every four years. 50 European countries will be participating.

    The post Muay Thai to make debut at European Games 2023 first appeared on Thai PBS World : The latest Thai news in English, News Headlines, World News and News Broadcasts in both Thai and English. We bring Thailand to the world.

    3 March 2021
    News
    https://www.thaipbsworld.com/?p=262555
  • Marital infidelity a hard (and illegal) habit to give up in Thailand

    Hands up if you know someone who is having an extramarital affair. In fact, most people reading this will know of someone who is “playing away from home”, given surveys...

    The post Marital infidelity a hard (and illegal) habit to give up in Thailand first appeared on Thai PBS World : The latest Thai news in English, News Headlines, World News and News Broadcasts in both Thai and English. We bring Thailand to the world.

    Hands up if you know someone who is having an extramarital affair.

    In fact, most people reading this will know of someone who is “playing away from home”, given surveys that show infidelity is still a commonplace practice in Thailand.

    However, if you believe cheating on your spouse carries no penalties, think again.

    Thai law protects the sanctity of wedding vows, and adulterers can face a hefty fine and other, even stricter penalties.

    Threat to career prospects

    Both the Royal Thai Army (RTA) and the Royal Thai Police recently announced that any of its members found to be unfaithful to their spouse would face disciplinary action. Harsher penalties apply if the offence is repeated or if there are signs of domestic violence.

    Cheated-on spouses can also come forward and seek help, including child support that is directly deducted from the husband’s salary.

    Just last month, the RTA announced that a junior soldier had been disciplined twice and lost his bonus for failing to be a “model citizen”. This was after his legal spouse complained that her husband was openly conducting a relationship with another woman and abusing her in other ways, too.

    According to guidelines set by the Civil Service Commission, civil servants can be fired and even lose their state pension if they are caught engaging in extramarital affairs. This rule is also applicable to common-law relationships.

    Long arm of the law

    Relationships outside the civil or military service are also protected by law. According to legal experts, a legally married spouse can sue the third person (mistress/paramour) for compensation. The lawsuit, however, must be filed within a year of learning about the affair.

    Romantic messages or incriminating photographs can be used as evidence in court, which has a deadline of six months to issue a verdict. If the case is backed by solid proof, the third person will be ordered to pay compensation to the plaintiff.

    However, the final compensation – or price for the heartache – is set by the court.

    Also, the plaintiff can sue for compensation without divorcing their partner and can file a second lawsuit if the affair continues.

    Estranged wives have revealed, on condition of anonymity, that they were paid six-digit compensation thanks to the courts.

    A nation of bed-hoppers?

    Even though Thai law protects marriages, Thais were found to be most unfaithful nationality in a 2012 survey of 29,000 people in 36 countries conducted by condom manufacturer Durex. Dating website, Match.com, reported similar findings in its survey on infidelity.

    Thais’ casual attitude towards marital fidelity is perhaps best illustrated by the constant stream of headline-making celebrity “scandals”. It is no secret that many high-profile Thais like to have more than one partner in their life.

    Actress Tanyares Engtrakul often makes headlines for trying to rein in her wayward husband, Sanchai “Peck” Engtrakul.

    Last month, Tanyares was quick to offer moral support to a woman who tearfully intervened at her husband’s wedding to his mistress.

    “My support goes out to you and your family … Hang in there! #LifeismoredramaticthanTVseries #MajorWifeTeam #WifeNo1,” read Tanyares’s Instagram message to Punpun Mookaew.

    Meanwhile, Deputy Agriculture and Cooperatives Minister Thamanat Prompow has openly declared he has two wives. When registering his assets before taking his Cabinet post in 2019, he identified Arisara Prompow as his legal spouse and former Miss Thailand Tanaporn Srivirach as his common-law wife.

    Polygamy was accepted practice in Thailand for centuries, before it was banned in 1935 – a few years after the 1932 Siamese Revolution.

    By Thai PBS World’s General Desk

    The post Marital infidelity a hard (and illegal) habit to give up in Thailand first appeared on Thai PBS World : The latest Thai news in English, News Headlines, World News and News Broadcasts in both Thai and English. We bring Thailand to the world.

    3 March 2021
    Around Thailand
    https://www.thaipbsworld.com/?p=262554
  • Confusing picture of Thai protests

    A moderate question to the increasingly splintered anti-establishment movement is where Panusaya “Rung” Sithijirawattanakul was on Sunday. A harder question is whether ideologies that clashed many times in the history of...

    The post Confusing picture of Thai protests first appeared on Thai PBS World : The latest Thai news in English, News Headlines, World News and News Broadcasts in both Thai and English. We bring Thailand to the world.

    A moderate question to the increasingly splintered anti-establishment movement is where Panusaya “Rung” Sithijirawattanakul was on Sunday. A harder question is whether ideologies that clashed many times in the history of mankind can work hand in hand to put away some common enemies.

    The former question might be slightly ominous, but it can be argued that it is normal for a large organization to have internal conflicts, and that “personal” issues can be put aside when push comes to shove.

    The latter question, however, points at something profoundly troublesome.

    The Free Youth network, operating under a slogan REDEM (Restart Democracy) which can turn to be its new name, had sparked a big controversy late last year that seemed to suggest a major ideological
    disagreement with Khana Ratsadon people. Its RT (Restart Thailand) logo was red with the letters R and T styled to resemble the hammer and sickle, a symbol favoured by advocates of communism. Khana Ratsadon leader Parit Chiwarak was subsequently quick to denounce communism, and Free Youth’s virtual response to that was “What’s wrong with the system?”

    Parit and other Khana Ratsadon do not say it out loud, but it is assumed that they prefer capitalistic democracy. This means they are against socialism in an extreme form, in which wealth is a lot more “equal” among the population and the state is strictly a provider, not facilitator. That the West obviously supports Khana Ratsadon makes it virtually impossible for the group to advocate communism or socialism.

    “We thought Khana Ratsadon and Free Youth were indistinguishable. They are not,” said a pro-government broadcast commentator. The question now is whether their differences are reconcilable.

    After its RT symbol came under criticism and skepticism left and right, Free Youth went on Facebook to denounce capitalism, which is generally associated with the United States, a democratic idol of many people. The network virtually said that communism is an antidote to capitalism, which was a “failure.”

    “It’s not true that communism takes everything away from you. It doesn’t take the toothbrush from you, but only makes sure that toothbrush factories belong to the labour, not entrepreneurs,” Free Youth said in a statement, stressing that communism was better than dictatorship and has never been given enough time to prove its worth. It was a remark that did not touch upon one crucial point, though, which is that dictatorship, not democracy, seems much more comfortable with socialism or communism.

    Can it be said that Free Youth would rather go along with China and Russia whereas Khana Ratsadon would prefer the United States and European Union?

    That question arouses curiosity, but then problems with the “guards” make the whole thing look more puzzling. There are advocates of extremism and there are those who just wanted to protect other protesters and not provoke. Fighting over funds has also negatively impacted the images of all guards. This kind of situations allegedly prevails among both Khana Ratsadon and Free Youth vigilant forces.

    Fierce verbal fighting among the guards through the social media has painted the entire anti-establishment movement in an unfavorable light, in addition to some other scandals that certain iconic figures still have to address. But, now, the most urgent question is whether and how Free Youth and Khana Ratsadon can get along.

    Increasingly weak, violent and leaderless protests may be short-lived

    Inspired by the ongoing anti-coup protests in Myanmar, and enraged by the indictment and detention of four protest leaders on lèse majesté charges, Thailand’s anti-establishment protests resumed after a pause since mid-December. Large-scale protests no more?

    The question used to be asked in whispers, when FreeYouth and Khana Ratsadon were holding separate protests and their leaders were avoiding being seen together, but it has grown louder. Probably the toughest form of that question has been posted on a pro-government YouTube channel: What exactly is Free Youth fighting for _ socialistic equality in which everyone has the same soap, or democratic equality in which anyone can make a soap?

    “This is not a fight for democracy as we know it,” the man said.’

    He should not be surprised, though. Thai politics has been plagued with ironies, big and small. “Pro-democracy” uprisings in the 70s targeted capitalism and China was frowned upon by the powers-that-be. Current protests deplore what Beijing does, particularly when Hong Kong is concerned, and the United States, the model of “Anyone can get rich because he or she is free to invent, copyright and market anything” democracy, is held by many in the highest regard. Thai authorities, meanwhile, are appreciating China a lot more than in the past and view the West with much greater doubts than before.

    Therefore, ironies exist on both sides of the national divide. A well-known journalist sympathetic with protesters has insisted that old-timers and youngsters alike are flip-flopping. “I’m seeing a lot of official remarks praising China and recommending Chinese books,” he said. “At the same time, when Thai kids discuss political ideologies (favored by China), they are described as insane.”

    But the problem is that the old-timers do not want changes. The youngsters do. In other words, what the new generation ideologically believe matters more.

    Now, the common enemies of the networks in the protest movement are the powers-that-be, so open, vociferous ideological conflicts among protesters cannot be expected. A portrait burning incident last Sunday might paper over serious disagreement within the entire movement. However, differences can become tumultuous in the future as history has shown that while political animals can bend the rules once in a while and come together, real ideologies compete to the very end and seek to
    suppress one another.

    By Tulsathit Taptim

    The post Confusing picture of Thai protests first appeared on Thai PBS World : The latest Thai news in English, News Headlines, World News and News Broadcasts in both Thai and English. We bring Thailand to the world.

    3 March 2021
    Highlight
    https://www.thaipbsworld.com/?p=262548
  • Myanmar Journal: “No need to worry. The Burmese Military has taken care of the nation’s situation.”

    by David Tun in Yangon March 2 – Wednesday is the 59th anniversary of the first coup in Myanmar in 1962, and the protests and crackdowns continue. San Chaung and...

    The post Myanmar Journal: “No need to worry. The Burmese Military has taken care of the nation’s situation.” first appeared on Thai PBS World : The latest Thai news in English, News Headlines, World News and News Broadcasts in both Thai and English. We bring Thailand to the world.

    by David Tun in Yangon

    March 2 – Wednesday is the 59th anniversary of the first coup in Myanmar in 1962, and the protests and crackdowns continue.

    San Chaung and Myaynigone remain the hot-spots in Yangon. While ample amounts of tear gas, stun grenades, water cannons and physical assaults were used, there were no reports of fatalities. It was far deadlier, however, in Kalay, Sagaing Region. Live ammunition was used against protestors. Local media reported that were 19 injured, with four critical.

    The Myanmar Lanzin headline on March 3, 1962 says “No need to worry. The Burmese Military has taken care of the nation’s situation.”

    Meanwhile, Christine Burgener, the UN Special Envoy on Myanmar, said that the military is trying to provoke the people into committing violence. The State-owned media, however, reported that the military had issued a command for riot police to stop using live ammunition against protestors. It also said that the people were using weapons, such as slingshots and petrol bombs, and that security personnel had to defend themselves.

    People believe that, as it has done in the past, the military is beginning to pin the blame for violent deaths and other atrocities on civilians, and in turn, the police force.

    There is a video clip circling around, showing the police in Kalay walking up to people and, without warning, initiating a brawl. This was then followed by police announcing that the military will use live ammunition on the demonstrators.

    The Committee Representing Pyidaungsu Hluttaw (CRPH) is now resembling an interim, parallel government as it announced the appointment of four ministers to oversee 8 ministries. More appointments are expected to follow. The plan from the CRPH, for the people to form their own local governments, is being picked up by townships across the country, even in Hpakant, known for its jade mines, in the far-north of Myanmar.

    The people believe that any sort of compromise is no longer an option, due to the many atrocities the authorities have committed. Day time protests, night time pot banging at 8pm, now coupled with chants and songs, public candlelit prayers for the fallen and even praying to the spirits to put a curse on the Senior General Min Aung Hlaing, are all signs that the people remain defiant in face of armed threats.

    A soldier aims his rifle at civilians in San Chaung. (Photo by San Chaung Resident)

    As pressure mounts, police and the military continue their night raids and arrests of protestors, strikers and journalists. The Assistance Association for Political Prisoners reports that more than 1,300 people have been arrested, charged or imprisoned since the coup on February 1.

    Six journalists in Yangon are now charged under Section 505(a) of the penal code for publishing or circulating ‘statements, rumours or reports’, ‘with intent to cause, or which is likely to cause, any officer, soldier, sailor or airman, in the Army, Navy or Air Force to mutiny or otherwise disregard or fail in his duty’. 

    Conviction carries with it up to seven years in prison.

    Social media posts started flooding in saying that, in Amarapura Township in Mandalay, which is now under occupation by the military and the police, electricity has been cut and police and military are reportedly using live rounds against civilians, with several reportedly injured.


    March 1 – Crackdowns and raids

    Protests continue, in defiance of the brutal crackdowns by the police and the military. It seems that the military have decided to reinforce Yangon with more than just infantry regiments, as military in Navy uniforms have been seen in some townships of Yangon.

    There were no confirmed deaths reported today, but many people were reportedly injured.

    Home invasions during the day are now also a regular occurrence, as military and police break down doors and reportedly assault people in their homes.

    Navy seen in Yangon. (Photo by Yangon Resident)

    The police raided a church in Kachin state, when an alleged police informant was captured and detained there. At least 11 people were arrested at the church, including Christian ministers. In Mandalay, the Phalan Bo mosque was also raided, for allegedly sheltering protestors.

    Local media, Voice of Myanmar (VOM), reported a list of fatalities since February 1st. The toll came to 23, with speculation that some of the deaths were omitted only because of lack of detail and accurate information.

    Church gate in Lashio, Kachin State destroyed by soldiers and police. (Photo from Kachin Baptist Church Facebook page)

    The Central Bank of Myanmar has announced that individuals can only withdraw a maximum of 500,000 kyats (about 10,720 baht) from ATMs per day, 2 million Kyats (about 42,900 baht) per week and 20 million Kyats per week for businesses.

    As protestors gear up for another day of battles against security forces, they are also waiting to see whether the internet will be cut as scheduled, because today is the last day of the announced daily internet cuts.

    In Myeik, the police tried to arrest a journalist from DVB – Democratic Voice of Burma. In the videos online, he is seen asking the police why they had come. The police started throwing rocks and using slingshots against him, even as the journalists told them to stop and that he would surrender.

    Daily round-up of the latest events in Myanmar by ThaiPBS World correspondent David Tun.

    The post Myanmar Journal: “No need to worry. The Burmese Military has taken care of the nation’s situation.” first appeared on Thai PBS World : The latest Thai news in English, News Headlines, World News and News Broadcasts in both Thai and English. We bring Thailand to the world.

    3 March 2021
    Asean
    https://www.thaipbsworld.com/?p=262460
  • Pathum Thani COVID-19 cluster spread to 13 provinces, infects 676 people

    The Pathum Thani COVID-19 cluster has, so far, infected 676 people across 13 provinces, as Thailand records 35 new cases today, according to Centre for Covid-19 Situation (CCSA) spokesman Dr....

    The post Pathum Thani COVID-19 cluster spread to 13 provinces, infects 676 people first appeared on Thai PBS World : The latest Thai news in English, News Headlines, World News and News Broadcasts in both Thai and English. We bring Thailand to the world.

    The Pathum Thani COVID-19 cluster has, so far, infected 676 people across 13 provinces, as Thailand records 35 new cases today, according to Centre for Covid-19 Situation (CCSA) spokesman Dr. Taweesin Visanuyothin.
    He said that most of the infections linked to Pathum Thani markets, such as Pornpat, Suchart, Simummuang and Rangsit, are vendors, their families and those who came into close contact with them.
    According to Dr. Taweesin, the cluster is quite big as it has spread to Bangkok, Khon Kaen, Chainat, Phetchaburi, Nakhon Pathom, Nakhon Ratchasima, Nakhon Nayok, Nonthaburi, Samut Prakan, Saraburi, Ang Thong and Ayutthaya, and must be contained as soon as possible.
    Of the 35 new infections today, 25 are locally acquired, with the other ten being among arrivals from Turkey, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria and Myanmar who are in state quarantine.
    Cumulative infections since early last year, are 26,108, with 25,483 recoveries and 84 deaths. 541 others are still being treated in hospitals.

    The post Pathum Thani COVID-19 cluster spread to 13 provinces, infects 676 people first appeared on Thai PBS World : The latest Thai news in English, News Headlines, World News and News Broadcasts in both Thai and English. We bring Thailand to the world.

    3 March 2021
    Coronavirus Outbreak Update
    https://www.thaipbsworld.com/?p=262541
  • Economy must come before politics in Thai Cabinet reshuffle, say experts

    Business leaders and academics insist solving Thailand’s economic crisis must be the top priority in the upcoming Cabinet reshuffle. “The new ministers should also be highly competent and capable of...

    The post Economy must come before politics in Thai Cabinet reshuffle, say experts first appeared on Thai PBS World : The latest Thai news in English, News Headlines, World News and News Broadcasts in both Thai and English. We bring Thailand to the world.

    Business leaders and academics insist solving Thailand’s economic crisis must be the top priority in the upcoming Cabinet reshuffle.

    “The new ministers should also be highly competent and capable of pulling Thailand out of the middle-income trap,” said Saowaruj Rattanakhamfu, senior research fellow at Thailand Development Research Institute (TDRI).

    Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha is set to reshuffle the Cabinet after three members – Digital Economy and Society (DES) Minister Puttipong Punnakanta, Education Minister Nataphol Teepsuwan and Deputy Transport Minister Thaworn Senneam – were sentenced to jail for their role in protests which led to the coup that ousted an elected government in 2014.

    Saowaruj said the government must prioritise national interest over political wrangling in the main ruling party in choosing replacements for Puttipong and Nataphol.

    “Their successors need to be extremely competent because the Education and DES portfolios are very important,” she pointed out.

    “It is really unfortunate that the leaders of these two ministries change so often, because it disrupts the continuity of their policies,” she said, noting that DES and education ministers typically last less than two years.

    Thailand economy shrinks most since 1997 on tourism collapse

    Thailand’s pandemic-shattered economy suffered its worst full-year performance in more than two decades, data showed Monday, with officials citing the toll of both a gutted tourism industry and ongoing political upheaval.

    Poor in human capital

    Thailand’s economy shrank 6.1% last year, its worst contraction in 22 years, while the National Economic and Social Development Council forecasts growth of no more than 3% this year amid the fallout from COVID-19. Before the pandemic, a shortage of skilled labour was already dragging down growth of the Thai economy.

    Human capital is key to boosting a country’s competitiveness and to pulling it out of the middle-income trap, Saowaruj said.

    However, Thailand’s education sector has largely failed to produce the skilled workforce demanded by the high-tech and digital world. Fearful of a bleak future, some youngsters have formed the so-called “Bad Student” group to point out education failures and demand reforms.

    “TDRI has conducted student-centred experiments to find ways of improving education,” said Saowaruj.

    Meanwhile, the COVID-19 outbreak had exposed the education system’s lack of preparation in conducting online classes, she added.

    Slow digital transformation

    As for the DES Ministry, former ministers had focused far too much on suppressing government critics, often violating freedom of speech, she said.

    “The new minister should instead focus on good governance and transparency, as well as making government data more accessible to the general public,” she said.

    She added that chaos in the registration for cash handouts was a sign of the government’s slowness in digital transformation. The government had not collected enough data on people’s financial status, which led to inefficiency in handing out the aid, she said.

    Thailand’s private sector is also lagging behind other countries when it comes to digital transformation, as many manufacturing businesses still deploy old “2.0” technology, she said, citing a recent survey.

    Thailand’s tourism operators lobby for borders to reopen on July 1

    A group of leading tour operators and hoteliers in Thailand has launched a campaign to reopen the country on July 1, 2021. They say vaccines are a game changer that allow for the reopening of the country and for quarantine requirements to be dropped.

    Full support necessary

    Stanley Kang, chairman of the Joint Foreign Chambers of Commerce in Thailand, said he hopes the new ministers will work as a team. The ministers should also be given full authority to do their job, he said, referring to former finance minister Pridi Daochai, who stepped down in September last year after serving less than a month as minister.

    Pridi said he quit because of bad health, but the real reason is thought to be because his hands were tied as finance minister.

    Kang agreed with Saowaruj on the issue of human capital, saying it was key to attracting foreign direct investment.

    Foreign confidence shaken

    The impact of the pandemic coupled with political uncertainty have hit foreign investor confidence, the Foreign Business Confidence Index shows.

    Supant Mongkolsuthree, president of Federation of Thai Industries, said the private sector needs new ministers who can understand the economy and work with the existing economic team.

    As for the ongoing anti-establishment protests, he said the only way out of the conflict was for all sides to come together and negotiate.

    “We are already facing many serious economic issues and we don’t want political issues [added to the mix] because it would not benefit anyone. Political problems should be resolved through talks,” he said.

    Kalin Sarasin, chair of the Thai Chamber of Commerce, said the new ministers should have reputations for honesty and be widely accepted. “And the government has to support them fully. We don’t want a repeat of Pridi’s case,” he added.

    By Thai PBS World’s Business Desk

     

    The post Economy must come before politics in Thai Cabinet reshuffle, say experts first appeared on Thai PBS World : The latest Thai news in English, News Headlines, World News and News Broadcasts in both Thai and English. We bring Thailand to the world.

    3 March 2021
    Business
    https://www.thaipbsworld.com/?p=262497
  • Thailand’s tourism operators lobby for borders to reopen on July 1

    A group of leading tour operators and hoteliers in Thailand has launched a campaign to reopen the country on July 1, 2021. They say vaccines are a game changer that...

    The post Thailand’s tourism operators lobby for borders to reopen on July 1 first appeared on Thai PBS World : The latest Thai news in English, News Headlines, World News and News Broadcasts in both Thai and English. We bring Thailand to the world.

    A group of leading tour operators and hoteliers in Thailand has launched a campaign to reopen the country on July 1, 2021.

    They say vaccines are a game changer that allow for the reopening of the country and for quarantine requirements to be dropped.

    Launched on March 2, the #OpenThailandSafely campaign is the initiative of leading Bangkok-based private sector travel companies YAANA Ventures, Minor Group and Asian Trails with the support of other major companies including Cape & Kantary Hotels, Diethelm Travel, Capella Hotels and Resorts, EXO and many others.

    The campaign has laid out its arguments in a petition which will underpin a formal request to the government to respond favourably to the rollout of COVID-19 vaccination programmes underway in Europe, USA and other Thailand tourism source markets.

     The petition is open to anyone in Thailand or around the world at www.OpenThailandSafely.org .So far, there are 21 signatories to the campaign’s online letter, entitled ‘A call to reopen Thailand’. Big names in the inbound international tourism sector such as William Heinecke from Minor International and Willem Niemeijer of YAANA Ventures have signed the petition.

    The campaigners argue that July 1 is an appropriate date for reopening the border because the majority of citizens in the US and Europe will have been vaccinated by then. It also gives time to Thai medical authorities to vaccinate both front line staff in hospitality settings in Thailand and/or vulnerable citizens around the country.

    A resumption of tourism on that date means international travellers have enough time to make plans and bookings, and it also allows airlines, hotels, tour operators and others to start marketing and sales and get ready for tourism operations to resume.

    If the borders do reopen on July 1, the campaigners expect thatThailand will take at least a year, probably longer, to return to the large numbers of international visitors that it enjoyed before the Covid-19 crisis.

    To ensure the safe reopening of Thailand, the petition argues that “international tourists can be asked to satisfy any safeguards the Thai Government may require. This may, for example, include showing officially recognised proof of a Covid-19 vaccination from their home country, purchasing health insurance, showing evidence of a negative COVID-19 test within 72 hours of departure, and so on.”

    “The reopening on the 1st of July would be a strategic opportunity for Thailand to show a leadership role among Asian countries and prepare the way for a solid recovery of the Thai economy in 2022,” said YAANA Ventures’ CEO Willem Niemeijer.

    The #OpenThailandSafely campaign will send the 1st July request to Prime Minister General Prayut Chan-o-cha, the Minister of Tourism and Sports, Mr Phiphat Ratchakitprakarn, and the Tourism Authority of Thailand’s governor Mr Yuthasak Supasorn.

    Thailand tourism, pre-COVID, was worth about 2.9 trillion baht (about US$96.5 billion). Some 39.7 million international visitors in 2019 helped sustain up to 8.3 million jobs. However, arrivals fell to 6.7 million in 2020 making between two and four million people unemployed. The country has been closed to international leisure travellers since early 2020.

    Meanwhile, destinations such as Seychelles, Maldives, Greece and Sri Lanka have either opened borders already or are in discussions to do so in light of successful COVID vaccine rollouts in their key source markets.

    The post Thailand’s tourism operators lobby for borders to reopen on July 1 first appeared on Thai PBS World : The latest Thai news in English, News Headlines, World News and News Broadcasts in both Thai and English. We bring Thailand to the world.

    3 March 2021
    Business
    https://www.thaipbsworld.com/?p=262523
  • Thailand’s anti-establishment movement calls for immediate release of their leaders

    Panasaya “Rung” Sithijirawattanakul, along with members of the United Front of Thammasat and Demonstration group, read out a statement in front of Bangkok Remand Prison this morning, to demand the...

    The post Thailand’s anti-establishment movement calls for immediate release of their leaders first appeared on Thai PBS World : The latest Thai news in English, News Headlines, World News and News Broadcasts in both Thai and English. We bring Thailand to the world.

    Panasaya “Rung” Sithijirawattanakul, along with members of the United Front of Thammasat and Demonstration group, read out a statement in front of Bangkok Remand Prison this morning, to demand the release of their core leaders Parit “Penguin” Chiwarak, Anon Nampa, Somyos Prueksakasemsook and Patiwat “Mor Lam Bank” Saraiyaem, who are currently being held on remand awaiting trial on lèse majesté charges.

    Panasaya announced that the statement will be sent to their leaders, and they have posted hard copies in front of the remand prison’s front gate.

    Meanwhile, the entrance and the exit to and from Klong Prem prison, where musician and activist Ammie allegedly set fire to a picture of HM the King on Sunday morning, have been sealed off, to maintain peace and order. Crowd control police are also posted there.

    Currently, many prisons are not allowing relatives, only lawyers and inquiry officials to visit prisoners, to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

    The post Thailand’s anti-establishment movement calls for immediate release of their leaders first appeared on Thai PBS World : The latest Thai news in English, News Headlines, World News and News Broadcasts in both Thai and English. We bring Thailand to the world.

    3 March 2021
    News
    https://www.thaipbsworld.com/?p=262525
  • Bangkok’s police chief confirms arrest of “Ammy Bottom Blues” in Ayutthaya

    Rock singer Ammy Bottom Blues, or Chai-amorn Kaewviboon, wanted by the police for allegedly setting fire to HM the King’s portrait in front of Khlong Prem prison early Sunday morning, has...

    The post Bangkok’s police chief confirms arrest of “Ammy Bottom Blues” in Ayutthaya first appeared on Thai PBS World : The latest Thai news in English, News Headlines, World News and News Broadcasts in both Thai and English. We bring Thailand to the world.

    Rock singer Ammy Bottom Blues, or Chai-amorn Kaewviboon, wanted by the police for allegedly setting fire to HM the King’s portrait in front of Khlong Prem prison early Sunday morning, has been arrested at a rental apartment in Ayutthaya province.

    Pol Lt-Gen Pakkapong Pongpetra, commissioner of Metropolitan Police Bureau, told the media that the suspect was apprehended by police at about 1am this morning and was taken to a hospital in the province for initial treatment for injuries to his left shoulder and pelvis.

    The singer was then escorted to the Police General Hospital in Bangkok for further treatment and, eventually, questioning.

    At about 2am this morning, Panusaya Sithijirawattanakul, one of the Ratsadon core leaders, posted a message on Facebook urging Ratsadon supporters to offer moral support to the arrested singer.

    Ammie is reported to have been injured when he fell while trying to scale Khlong Prem prison’s wall, in his alleged attempt to set fire to the King’s portrait.

    The singer was originally at Rama 9 Hospital in Bangkok, when the police sought a warrant for his arrest on Tuesday, but left before police arrived, prompting the manhunt, which ended in Ayutthaya.

    A prominent figure among the anti-establishment Ratsadon core members, Ammy first attracted public attention when he splashed blue paint on police during a protest last year.

    Pol Lt-Gen Pakkapong maintains that they have sufficient evidence, not just CCTV footage, to substantiate charges against him.

    Ammy, and two other suspects accused of involvement in torching the King’s portrait, have been charged with arson, lèse majesté and intrusion onto state property at night.

    The post Bangkok’s police chief confirms arrest of “Ammy Bottom Blues” in Ayutthaya first appeared on Thai PBS World : The latest Thai news in English, News Headlines, World News and News Broadcasts in both Thai and English. We bring Thailand to the world.

    3 March 2021
    News
    https://www.thaipbsworld.com/?p=262518
  • Naturally carbonated water bottled and served to Thai PM – Thai PBS World Tonight [2nd March 2021]

    Some of the naturally carbonated mineral water, from Huay Krachao district of Kanchanaburi province, has been bottled and brought to Bangkok to serve to prime minister Prayut Chan-O-Cha at government...

    The post Naturally carbonated water bottled and served to Thai PM - Thai PBS World Tonight [2nd March 2021] first appeared on Thai PBS World : The latest Thai news in English, News Headlines, World News and News Broadcasts in both Thai and English. We bring Thailand to the world.

    Some of the naturally carbonated mineral water, from Huay Krachao district of Kanchanaburi province, has been bottled and brought to Bangkok to serve to prime minister Prayut Chan-O-Cha at government house.

    The prime minister suggested that the water could be developed further, as a community enterprise product, to generate income for the locals.

    Department of Groundwater Resources director-general, Sakda Wichiensin said that, throughout the weekend, a lot of visitors came to sample the carbonated water.

    The post Naturally carbonated water bottled and served to Thai PM - Thai PBS World Tonight [2nd March 2021] first appeared on Thai PBS World : The latest Thai news in English, News Headlines, World News and News Broadcasts in both Thai and English. We bring Thailand to the world.

    3 March 2021
    Video
    https://www.thaipbsworld.com/?p=262515